Nebulas

IC 405

IC 405 (also known as the Flaming Star Nebula, SH 2-229, or Caldwell 31) is an emission and reflection nebula[1] in the constellation Auriga, surrounding the bluish star AE Aurigae. It shines at magnitude +6.0. The nebula is shot in narrow-band and processed in the SHO palette.

SII = 15 * 1800 sec. bin1, Ha = 13 * 1800 sec. bin1, OIII = 21 * 1800 sec. bin1

Total 24.5 hours.

Processing - Pixinsight 1.8, the final processing in Photoshop.

November-December 2019, January-March 2020

IC 405

NGC 6210

NGC 6210 (another designation - PK 43 + 37.1) is a planetary nebula in the constellation Hercules. The object is located at a distance of 7450 light years from the solar system. The apparent magnitude is 8.8. The aApparent size of the object is 0.35 '.

L = 28 * 600 sec. bin1, RGB = 15 * 900 sec. bin2, Ha = 41 * 900 sec. bin1, OIII = 20 * 600 sec., 33 * 900 sec., bin1

Total - 37.75 hours.

Processing - Pixinsight 1.8, the final processing in Photoshop.

April-May 2019, March-May 2020

NGC 6210

IC 410

A faint, dusty rose of the northern sky, emission nebula IC 410 lies about 12,000 light-years away in the constellation Auriga. The cloud of glowing hydrogen gas is over 100 light-years across, sculpted by stellar winds and radiation from embedded open star cluster NGC 1893. Formed in the interstellar cloud a mere 4 million years ago, bright cluster stars are seen just below the prominent dark dust cloud near picture center. Notable near the 3 o'clock position in this wide, detailed view are two relatively dense streamers of material trailing away from the nebula's central regions. Potentially sites of ongoing star formation, these cosmic tadpole shapes are about 10 light-years long.

L = 17 * 900 sec. bin1, R = 14 * 1000 sec. bin2, G = 14 * 1100 sec. bin2, B = 14 * 1200 sec. bin2, Ha = 12 * 1800 sec. bin1, OIII = 14 * 1800 sec. bin1

Total 30 hours.

Pixinsight 1.8 and Photoshop.

IC 410

NGC 6543

The Cat's Eye Nebula or NGC 6543, is a relatively bright planetary nebula in the northern constellation of Draco, discovered by William Herschel on February 15, 1786. It was the first planetary nebula whose spectrum was investigated by the English amateur astronomer William Huggins, demonstrating that planetary nebulae were gaseous and not stellar in nature.

NGC 6543 is a high northern declination deep-sky object. It has the combined magnitude of 8.1, with high surface brightness. Its small bright inner nebula subtends an average of 16.1 arcsec, with the outer prominent condensations about 25 arcsec. Deep images reveal an extended halo about 300 arcsec or 5 arcmin across, that was once ejected by the central progenitor star during its red giant phase.

L = 20 * 1800 sec. bin1, RGB = 12 * 900 sec. bin2, Ha = 13 * 1800 sec. bin1, OIII = 12 * 1800 sec. bin1

Total - 31.5 hours.

Pixinsight 1.8, Photoshop.

july-august 2018, march-april 2019

NGC 6543